* Patriots of the American Revolution *
(version December 1, 2018)
Please email corrections to Mike Clark
 

DAR Patriot Ancestor Search

 

Josiah Barker (1727-1808) of New Hampshire served during the American Revolution first as a private starting in April 1777 for a 3-month enlistment in Capt. Richard Weare's 5th Company of the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment commanded by Col. Alexander Scamell. Josiah then enlisted for 8 months, extending into Jan. 1778, as a private in Capt. Caleb Robinson's Company of the 2nd New Hampshire Battalion commanded by Col. Nathan Hale. Josiah is the father-in-law of Patriot Ward Cotton Weeks.

 

Aaron Bristol (1743-1843) of Connecticut served during the American Revolution in Capt. Amos Wilson's Company, which was part of the 2nd Battalion, Wadsworth's Brigade commanded by Col. Fisher Gray.

 

Hachiliah Bridges Jr. (1737-1792) of Massachusetts served during the American Revolution from April 1778 to July 1781 under several commands. Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War, Vol 2, p. 489, summarizes his service record. Hachiliah is the great-grandson of accused Salem witch Sarah Cloyes, who appears in the bottom part of this list.

 

Beriah Brown (1714/15-1792) of Rhode Island served during the American Revolution as a financier of the American privateer George Wait Babcock, who has the distinction of plundering more British ships during the Revolution than any other privateer. The lineage leading from Martha Mae Brown (c.1778-1855) to her presumed grandfather Beriah still needs to be verified.

 

Charles Burrall (1719-1803) of Connecticut served during the American Revolution from 1774-1783 as a Colonel of the 14th Foot Regiment of the Connecticut Militia. His regiment marched to reinforce the troops on or after Dec. 31, 1774 at the Battle of Quebec. Later, the 14th was in the Northern Command of the Continental Army (also called the Northward) under Gen. Horatio Gates, and was present on Aug. 16, 1777 at the Battle of Bennington (Bennington Alarm). (NOTE: The Northward was commanded by Gates from Aug. 19, 1777 to April 17, 1778, and included part of nothern New York, and the present state of Vermont.) Hopkins (1903) in Kelloggs in the Old World and New states that Burrall was, "appointed in 1776 to command a regiment in the Brigade of Gen. Wadsworth; served under Washington on Long Island and New Jersery, and was with his regiment at Ticonderoga, Crown Point, and the Battle of Saratoga. However, the lineage leading from Susan Wells (d. 1801) to her presumed grandfather Charles Burrall is poorly documented and still needs to be verified.

 

John Ford (1720/21-1781) of Connecticut served during the American Revolution in 1780 as a private in the 2nd Connecticut Regiment. John Ford is the great-grandfather of Ascha Maria Goodrich (1929-1925), who married Corydon S. Harris (1812-1895).

 

Joseph Goodwin (1754-1838) of Maine enlisted during the American Revolution on May 3, 1775 in Capt. Jeremiah Hill's Company of the regiment commanded by Col. James Scammon, presumably the 30th Regiment of the Massachusetts Militia. He then enlisted on June 28, 1775 for 1 month and 6 days in Capt. Philip Hubbard's Company in Col. Scammon's Regiment. Joseph Goodwin is the grandfather of Amanda Lord (1810-1890), who married John Weeks (1806-1882).

 

Dr. Ivory Hovey III (1748-1818) of Massachusetts served during the American Revolution as a surgeon on the sloop Tyrannicide (Capt. Fisk); and for Col. Smith, Col. Scammel and Col. Wigglesworth. Ivory is the great-grandfather of Susan Hovey (c.1847-1873), who married Civil War Veteran Daniel Smith, Junior (1841-1915). In turn, they are the grandparents of Helen Louise Weeks (1902-1982).

 

Manasseh Smith (1748-1823) of Massachusetts served during the American Revolution from Sept. 1775 to about Dec. 1776 as a chaplain in Col. Whitcomb's and Col. Whitney's regiments. Present at the siege of Boston. Manasseh is the great-grandfather of Susan Hovey (c.1847-1873), who married Civil War Veteran Daniel Smith, Junior (1841-1915). In turn, they are the grandparents of Helen Louise Weeks (1902-1982).

 

Samuel Stinson (1753-1846) of Massachusetts served from June 1777 thru 1780 in the American Revolution - first as a private in Capt. John Read's Company, Col. Alden's 7th Massachusetts Regiment; then in Capt Fronthingham's Company; and finally in Col. Crane's Artillary Regiment. He received a military pension for his service, and he was the last surviving Revolutionary War solider in Deer Isle, Maine. Samuel is the great-grandfather of Susan Hovey (c.1847-1873), who married Civil War Veteran Daniel Smith, Junior (1841-1915). In turn, they are the grandparents of Helen Louise Weeks (1902-1982).

 

Joel Thompson (1737-1804) of Connecticut enlisted during the American Revolution on Feb. 12, 1777 as a corporal in the Continental Regiment commanded by Col. Seth Warner. He re-enlisted on July 12, 1777 in Capt. Simeon Smith's Company in the same regiment, and there is a comment that he was "taken on Sept. 26th".

 

Ward Cotton Weeks (1753-1789) of New Hampshire enlisted during the American Revolution on August 1, 1775 as a sergeant in Capt. Samuel Gilman's Company in Col. Enoch Poor's Regiment. He then enlisted as a private in Capt. Zebulon Weeks's Company of the regiment commanded by Col. Nicholas Gilman, and fought in the Battle of Saratoga. Ward is the son-in-law of Patriot Josiah Barker.

 

 

 


* Other Interesting Ancestors *

 

Sarah Cloyes/Cloyce (neé Towne) (1637-1703) had nothing to do with the American Revolution, but she was accused of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials, which makes her an interesting ancestor to learn more about. There is a Wikipedia article about her, and her two sisters, who were also accused of witchcraft. Sarah is the great-grandmother of Revolutionary War Veteran Hachiliah Bridges, who appears in the top part of this list.

 

Daniel Smith (1841-1915) also had nothing to do with the American Revolution, but he did serve in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He fought with the Massachusetts 10th Infantry Regiment, and died in an old soldiers home in Chelsea, Massachusetts.

 

Mayflower Ancestor - There is family lore of possible descent from one of the Pilgrims who landed at Plymouth Rock of the Mayflower. This has not been confirmed, but if true the Mayflower ancestor probably is listed on the page that the link below leads to.

 

 

 

 

by Janet & Michael Clark

This is an evolving document.
Despite our best intentions it probably contains mistakes.
Please let us know if you spot any by sending an email to Mike Clark

 

 



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