* Toombs Family Obituaries and Biographies *
Burlington, Wisconsin

 

Index of Individuals by surname

 

AMOS, FRANK


Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, Wednesday, December 11, 1901.

Frank Amos, of the Holllster-Amos Company Suffers Stroke of Apoplexy at His Home Late Tuesday Afternoon.

Frank Amos, one of the most prominent business men of this city and a co-partner in the Holllster-Amos company died suddenly at his home, 703 Algoma street, at four o'clock Tuesday afternoon. The news of the sudden death was soon noised about the city and expressions of regret and sympathy for the stricken family were heard on every side very shortly after the sad occurrence. While Mr. Amos had not been feeling well for the past two or three months, it was not suspected that death was near, and his sudden calling to the great beyond has come like a shock upon his family and friends. Mr. Amos was not what would be called a rugged man as to his health but with the exception of occasional attacks of rheumatism he was in good health until the last two or three months. During that time he had complained more or less of trouble with his head and at various times had spoken of retiring from active work. On Tuesday, afternoon he was at the office of the Hollister-Amos company and at about 3:30 o'clock he started to drive down town and had gone about as far as the First ward, school when he commenced to feel ill. He returned to the office and told Col. S.W. Hollister, his partner, that he was feeling badly, and at his suggestion Mr. Hollister got into the rig and drove Mr. Amos home. On the, way Mr. Amos complained of feeling worse and of having a pain in his head. Upon arriving at the house Mr. Hollister offered to assist Mr. Amos into the house but the latter protested that he could go in alone. Although he seemed weak and made progress but slowly he succeeded in getting into the house unaided and sat down in a chair while Mr. Hollister started to notify Mrs. Amos who was at the Algoma street M. E. church where she had gone to attend to some preliminary work for the church fair. Mr. Amos asked the housemaid for his wife and Almost immediately afteward, and before Mrs. Amos could arrive home, expired. Dr. C.W. Oviatt was summoned and he pronounced the death due to appoplexy.

LIFE OF MR. AMOS
Frank Amos was born in London, England, May 2. 1840, and came with his parents to this country in 1848 where they settled in Racine. Mr. Amos lived there for a number of years going from there to Burlington, Wis. where he engaged in the business of farming. On Nov. 27, 1862, he was married to Miss Caroline L. Loomis, of Burlington, a cousin of Col.S.W. Hollister. In 1866, Mr. and Mrs. Amos came to Oshkosh to live and he entered the business of wood selling and occasionally in the winter time went into the woods as a logging contractor. In 1882 Mr. Amos, with the late John Stanhilber and Col. S.W. Hollister bought out the lumber and saw mill business of Mead & Ripley and the business was conducted under the firm name of the Stanhilber-Amos company. In 1893, Messers Hollister and Amos purchased the interests of Mr. Stanhilber and the co-partnership under the name of the Hollisterr-Amos company was formed and continued up to this time. By a strange coincidence Mr. Amos' partner, Mr. Stanhilber also died of apoplexy about a year after retiring from business. During the past several months his health being poor, Mr. Amos had determined to retire from business and several months ago had purchased from the company, of which he was a member, the large stock farm near Fond Du Lac. During the past summer a number of improvements have been made on the place and new bulldings erected and it had been arranged that after January first, Mr. Holllster was to purchase the interest of Mr. Amos in the lumbering business, and Mr. Amos would remove to his farm where he would spend the remainder of his life in the comforts earned by years of hard labor. Besides his wife, Mr. Amos is survived by one daughter, Mrs. George Morris, of Fort Atkinson, and one brother in this country, Arthur Amos, who lives at Kimball, Neb. Mrs. Morris arrived today to attend the funeral of her father. Mr. Morris has but recently purchased an interest in the re-organised McMillen company's factory and business and his family was about to remove to this city to make their home. The deceased was a man of sterling integrity, upright and respected. He was idustrious and had succeeded in accumulating a comfortable fortune, but did not forget the less fortunate. However, any giving was done in a quiet way, characteristic of the man. He was modest and and retiring and was not a member of any secret societies. The funeral arrangements have not been made at this writing.


Biography from the website of the Oshkosh Public Museum

Frank Amos was born May 2, 1840 in London, England, the son of Hellen and William Amos. His parents immigrated to Racine, WI in 1848. His father died in 1851, leaving his mother a widow with three children. In 1860 he was working as a farm laborer on the Samuel Toombs farm, a relative of the family. He became a farmer in Burlington, WI and on November 27, 1862 married Caroline Louisa Loomis. The couple had two daughters, both born in Oshkosh, Edith and Ida. In 1866 they moved to Oshkosh, WI where he was engaged as a logging contractor. In 1882 he went into partnership with Seymour Hollister and John Stanhilber and purchased the Mead & Ripley Lumber Company and changed the name to Stanhilber-Amos Company. In 1893 the company became Hollister & Amos Lumber. In 1901 Frank planned to retire and purchased a farm near Fond du Lac, WI, but died in Oshkosh on December 10, 1901.

 


BUSHNELL, IDA


Burlington Standard Press Thursday, June 23, 1966, p. 6.

Miss Ida M. Bushnell, 90, R.3, died Wednesday, June 15, at the Burlington Nursing Home. She was born Sept.5 1875, in Burlington to William and Sarah Toombs Bushnell. She spent all her life in Burlington and never married. She pursued the occupation of housekeeper and was a member of Plymouth Congregational church. Mrs. Bushnell was a graduate of the University of Wisconsin and was a member of the 50-year alumni club. She taught Latin on a regular and a substitute basis. She donated a large tract of land between the old and new cemeteries at Brown's Lake. Funeral services will be held today, Thursday, June 23, at 2 p.m. from Plymouth Congregational chapel, with the Rev. Trent Rockwell officiating. Interment will be in Burlington cemetery. Miss Bushnell will be in state from 1 p.m. until time for services at the chapel. Arrangements were handled by the McCarthy-Rueter funeral home. Surviving are cousins and friends.


Racine Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Thursday June 16, 1966, p. 6D.

Ida M. Bushnell
Route 3, Bulington, Wis.
Age 90. Passed away June 15, 1966 in the Burlington Nursing Home. Miss Bushnell was born in Burlington on Sept. 5, 1875 to William and Sarah Toombs Bushnell. She was a member of the Plymouth Congregational Church, Burlington. Funeral arrangements are incomplete. McCARTY RUETER FUNERAL HOME, 481 Milwaukee Ave., Burlington, Directors.

 


BUSHNELL, DAVID


Burlington Township Biographical Sketches As published in "The History of Racine and Kenosha Counties" (Chicago: 1879), pages 634-653

DAVID BUSHNELL. farmer, Sec. 33; P. O. Burlington; he was born on the shores of Oneida Lake, Madison Co., N. Y., June 17, 1814; lived there and assisted his father on the farm till 1836, and then came to Wisconsin; stopped a very short time at Pike Creek, then wandered across the country prospecting till he arrived at the lower forks of Fox River; he located within one mile of village of Burlington; engaged at farming built a wigwam, in which he lived for a few years; Mr. Bushnell is the earliest settler living in the neighborhood in the early times they had to undergo many hardships and privations; in 1837, the Settlers' Claim Society was organized; its object, to protect their claims from the claim-jumpers; in those days, a man settled and lived on a lot thirty days, had to cut so many rails, or plow so furrows, to entitle him to his claim; the industrious men often had trouble with claim-jumpers and loafers; on one occasion, in 1837, the society found it necessary to engage in a skirmish with the interlopers; it took place near where the village of Burlington is now situated; it is known as the battle of Burlington, fought by upwards of one dozen men; no one was seriously wounded; Norman Dyer was shot in a limb by William Curtis, who was firing in the dark, and aimed at Silas Peck, whose claim Curtis had tried to jump, but failing in his attempt, and aggravated by his failure, tried to kill Silas Peck. After the shooting, Curtis fled to parts unknown but was finally captured in Illinois, and tried in Springfield. His trial was postponed, he gave straw bail, escaped, and has never - been heard of since. Mr. Bushnell married in Burlington, Jan. 7, 1846, Miss Elizabeth Thompson; she was born in Madison Co., N. Y., March 26, 1828; had three children- only one now living - William K. Bushnell, born July 26, 1848; he is assisting his father on the farm. William Bushnell married Oct 20, 1870, Miss Adelaide Toombs, a native of Burlington Township; they have one daughter- Ida; they are living with his father, Mr. David Bushnell. He has never aspired to any political offices; he owns eighty-one acres within one mile of Burlington village; the farm is well improved, with spacious barns and a comfortable house.

 


BUSHNELL, SARAH (neé Toombs)


Racine Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Wednesday, December 2, 1936, p. 14.

Mrs. William Bushnell Dies at Her Home Here; Funeral on Thursday

One of Burlington's oldest residents, Mrs. William Bushnell, 85, died Monday night at her home just outside the city limits on Highway 43. Virtually all her life was spent on the farm where she died Oct. 20 of this year, she and and Mr. Bushnell marked the sixty-sixth anniversary of their wedding, and during those 66 years the farm on the old "Kenosha and Burlington road" had been her home. Mrs. Bushnell, whose maiden name was Sarah Adelaide Toombs, was born Feb. 15, 1851, at Racine, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Toombs. When she was a small girl her father went to California, lured there by the discovery of gold, and her mother returned to the old home in New York state. When Mrs. Bushnell was eight years old, her father returned from California, and the family was united again, living on a farm about two miles from Burlington, and near the Bushnell farm. Mr. and Mrs. Bushnell were married Oct 20, 1870, at Oshkosh, Wis. She saw Burlington grow from a small frontier town to the present city, and witnessed the sweeping changes in modes of living which came with the last 50 years. Surviving are her husband, William Bushnell, one daughter, Miss Ida Bushnell, who resided at home, and two brothers, Jerome Toombs, Orson. Ia., and Albert Toombs, Pompey's Pillar, Mont. Funeral services will be held Thursday at 2 p.m. at the Bushnell home on Highway 43. Rev. Carl Stackman, pastor of Plymouth Congregational church, will officiate and burial will be in the Burlington cemetery at Brown's lake.

 


BUSHNELL, WILLIAM


Racine Journal Times, Saturday November 9, 1940, p. 11.

Wm. Bushnell Dies Friday at His Farm Home

Friday afternoon William Bushnell, lifelong resident of this vicinity, son of pioneer settlers, and a pioneer in his own right, died at his farm home, just outside of the city limits, on Highway 43. Mr. Bushnell, 92 at the timer of his death, was one of the oldest persons in this vicinity. He had been in ill health for years, and during the past summer, was able to leave his home only infrequently. The son of Mr. and Mrs. David Bushnell, William Bushnell was born on the farm Where he died, July 6, 1848. His parents were among the first white people to come to Burlington, and he was born only a scant 15 years after the first white man made his "jackknife claim" where Burlington now stands. The farm where he was born, and where his life was spent, was purchased by his father from the the United States government, and has never been owned by anyone but a Bushnell. To Mr. Bushnell was granted the unusual privilege of seeing this country pass from the primitive days of the pioneer to the present--and all the intervening changes in methods and modes of life were to him actual experiences, not something merely read about. He was married to Sarah Adelaid Toombs, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Toombs on Oct. 20, 1870, at Oshkosh, Wis. Mrs. Bushnell, preceding him in death, passing away at her home Nov. 30, 1936. Surviving Mr. Bushnell's death is one daughter, Miss Ida Bushnell, who lived with him. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Monday, at the Bushnell home on Highway 43. Rev. Carl Stackman, pastor of Plymouth Congregational church, will officiate and burial will be in the family lot in the Burlington cemetery at Brown's lake.

 


HOLLISTER, ASA


Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, Thurs, June 12, 1890, p. 1.

DEATH OF ASA HOLLISTER

News has been received in this city [Oshkosh, Wisconisn] of the death of Asa Hollister, which occurred at Shawno last night. The deceased was seventy-three years old and leaves a wife and four sons, one of whom is S.W. Hoilister of this city.


Obituary from an unknown newspaper.

Asa A. Hollister, one of the early settlers of Winnebago Co., died at Shawano, Wisconsin, June 11, 1890. Mr. and Mrs. Hollister had gone to Shawano to spend a short time visiting their son William and family and while there he suffered an attach of liver trouble and died. His remains were brought to his home in this city, where funeral services were largely attended on Saturday morning. The sermon was preached by Rev. W. W. Stevens, a former pastor, from the text "We all do fade as a leaf," Isa 61:6. Mr. Hollister was born in Wayne County N.Y., Oct 10, 1817. In 1833 the family came westward and settled in Adrian, Michigan. Seven years later they removed to Racine County, Wis., where Asa was married in 1842 to Sarah M. Toombs. In May, 1845, they came to Oshkosh, then an Indian trading post consisting of three or four log houses, a store and a tavern. Mr. Hollister engaged in winter in the lumber business. In 1866, with his sons, he went into lumbering on a large scale, continuing until 1876, when he retired from active business life. Mr. and Mrs. Hollister united with the Congregational Church of this city in 1857, and remained in that connection until the Algoma Street Methodist Society was organized, when they connected themselves with that church, and have been two of the most useful and higher esteemed members. Mr. Hollister served the society as treasurer for seven years, until failing health compelled him to relinquish official work. He was a quiet, unassuming, straightforward Christian man, and his death was triumphant. He leaves a wife and four sons, an only daughter having died in childhood in 1857. The sons are all engaged in lumbering, Wm W. in Shawano, Seymour W. in Canada, Wright and Guy W. in Marinette, Wisconsin.


Shawno County Advocate, Thursday, June 19, 1890, p. 1.

Asa A. Hollister of Oshkosh died last week of liver complaint at the age of 72 years while on a visit to his son, W. W. Hollister of this city. His remains were taken to his home for burial.


Biography from the website of the Oshkosh Public Museum

Asa was born on Oct. 10, 1817 at Wayne County, New York. At age thirteen he removed with his parents to Chautauqua County, New York and they remained there until 1833. They then removed to Adrian, Michigan and stayed at that place for seven years. In 1840 the family removed to Racine County, Wisconsin. Asa was married there on Nov. 20, 1842 to Sarah M. Toombs. She was born circa 1827 at England. They came to Oshkosh, Winnebago County in May 1846, where Asa was engaged in the lumber business. They were listed in the 1860 federal census as residing in the fifth ward of the city of Oshkosh. They had a family of five children: William W.; Seymour W.; Philip W., resided at Oshkosh; Guy W., resided at Medford, Wisconsin; and Anna Hollister. Asa died at Shawano, Shawano County on June 11, 1890. He was returned to Oshkosh for burial in Riverside Cemetery.

 


HOLLISTER, GUY W.


Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, Saturday, April 10, 1909, p. 14.

HOLLISTER FUNERAL

The funeral services of the late Guy W. Hollister, a brother of P.W. Hollister, and Col. S.W. Hollister of this city, will be held Monday afternoon at two o'clock, at the home of P.W. Hollister, 12 Elm street. The Rev. Mr. Stair officiating. The remains will arrive tomoroww morning from Hot Springs, Ark., to which place Mr. Hollister went three weeks ago in the hope of improving his health. His home was at Stetsonville, Wis., and he was afflicted with heart trouble. Internment will be at Riverside cemetery.

 


HOLLISTER, LOTTIE (neé Loomis)


Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, Tuesday, August 20, 1935, p. 4.

WIDOW OF PIONEER LUMBERMAN PASSES AWAY HERE TODAY
Mrs. Lottie Loomis Hollister Dies at 1 o'Clock This Afternoon—Funeral is Thursday Mrs. Lottie Loomis Hollister, widow of Seymour W. Hollister, pioneer Oshkosh lumberman, died this afternoon at 1 o'clock at her home, 732 Algoma boulevard. She had been in failing health since early last November when she suffered a paralytic stroke. Mrs. Hollister had been active in various organizations of which she was a member up to that time but had to give up all activity when her illness confined her to her home.

CAME HERE IN 1889
She was born at Burlington, Wis. Nov. 11, 1866, the daughter of the late Charles W. and Hannah Brittian Loomis. She was graduated from Burlington high school and in1889 came to Oshkosh to reside and had lived here since that time. On Nov. 24, 1897, she was married to the late S. W. Hollister at Burlington. Mr. Hollister died in 1916. Survivors are a daughter, Miss Edith Loomis Hollister, who lived with her mother; and two stepsons, Carl W. Hollister and R. A. Hollister. both of this city. Also surviving are three grandchildren. Miss Helen Hollister, daughter of Carl W. Hollister. and Seymour W. and John R. Hollister, sons of R.A. Hollister.

MEMBER OF CHURCH
Mrs. Hollister was a member of the Algoma Boulevard Methodist Episcopal church. She was a member also of the Eastern Star, the Twentieth Century club, the Ladies Benevolent society, the West End Reading club and of the Ladies Aid society and the Mission ary society of the church. Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the home, 732 Algoma boulevard, in private. The Rev. Alfred Hood, pastor of the Algoma Boulevard Methodist Episcopal church will officiate. Burial will be at Riverside cemetery.


Biography from the website of the Oshkosh Public Museum

Lottie Irene Loomis was born November 11, 1866 in Burlington, WI, the daughter of Charles William and Hannah Brittain Loomis. Lottie had removed to Oshkosh in 1889. She married Seymour Hollister, a widower and her 1st cousin once removed (her grandmother and Seymour’s mother were sisters), on Nov. 24, 1897 at Burlington, Racine County. Seymour and Lottie had one daughter, Edith Loomis Hollister. Lottie died in Oshkosh, WI on Aug. 20, 1935. She was survived by her daughter Edith, two stepsons, Carl W. and R. A. Hollister, and three grandchildren.

 


HOLLISTER, PHILLIP W.


Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, Saturday Evening, Feb. 18, 1922, p. 1.

P.W. HOLLISTER PASSED AWAY EARLIER TODAY DEATH INTERVENES WHEN RECOVERY SEEMED TO BE REASONABLY SURE

P. W. Hollister, a resident of Oshkosh for many years, passed away this morning at his home. 12 Elm street. Death came suddenly, virtually without warning, and at a time when he appeared to be on the high road to recovery from an illness of about a week's duration. A week ago today he was taken ill while at Ripon. He had been suffering from a severe cold and while at Ripon his heart became affected. He consulted a physician, but was able to come home unattended and appeared to be making a complete recovery.

SEEMED TO IMPROVE
As late as yesterday he was examined by a physician and there was nothing at that time to indicate other than an improvement which spelled restoration of health, He retired feeling well. At about 6:30 this morning he was given a glass of milk by Mrs. Hollister, and he joked about it at the time. He appeared to feel perfectly well, and after drinking the milk, he stretched his arms over his head and took hold of the rounds of the head of his bed. He smiled and appeared to be about to speak when he suddenly relaxed and passed away, with absolutely no hint of impending dissolution.

BORN IN OSHKOSH
Philip Wright Hollister. more generaly known as Wright Hollister. was born in this city Jan. 2, 1859. and was 63 years of age. His parents were Asa and Sarah Hollister, pioneer residents of Oshkosh. His early life was spent in attending the public and High schools, but in the later years of his boyhood he entered the employ of the R. McMillen company here. His work was that of the office and when Mr. McMillen died. Mr. Hollister was occupying a position of confidential man to the head of the institution.

In 1888, he went to Marinette and organized the Menominee River Sash and Door company, where he remained until 1893. He then went to Chicago, where with his brother, the late Col. S. W. Hollister, he organized the Manufacturers and Builders Supply company. Later the name was changed to Hollister Brothers Lumber Company. In 1902 he returned to Oshkosh and was associated with his brother and the late Frank Amos in the lumber firm of Hollister, Amos & Co., a co-partnership.

FORMS AUTO COMPANY
He remained with that company until it was sold in 1921 to the Fuller Goodman company, when with his son, Leigh W. Hollister, he formed Hollister Auto company, 33-35 Aigoma boulevard. The company has but recently erected a new building, just east of the old garage. And the business has moved to it since the first of the present year.

Mr. Hollister was married March 31, 1880, to Miss Cora E. Frye of Fond Du Lac. There were two sons, Harry W. Hollister, who died in 1902, and Leigh W. Hollister, who with the widow survives. The widow and son are the only immediate relatives, except two nephews and one nice, R.A. Hollister, Carl W. Hollister, and Mrs. William C. Rouck, all of this city.

Mr. Hollister was a man of positive personality, but kindly disposed and most appeciated by those who were best acquainted with him. He was a member of the Elks, the Yacht club, and other social organizations and was an active and healthful influence in all of them.

EFFICIENT IN BUSINESS
In a business way. Mr. Hollister like his brother, the late Colonel Hollister, was recognized as particularly capable and efficient. He was thoroughly posted in all lines of the lumber industry, both as to the practical operation and the conduct of affairs of business.

FUNERAL MONDAY
The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the residence.

 


HOLLISTER, SARAH (neé Toombs)


Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, Saturday, March 30, 1907, p. 1.

MRS. HOLLISTER IS DEAD

Pioneer Resident Passes Away This afternoon at Three o'clock, After Extended Illness.

Mrs. Sarah Hollister of 571 High street passed away this afternoon at three o'clock after an extended illness. She would have been eighty years of age the 21st of next August. Deceased was the mother of Col. Seymour W. Hollister and P. W. Hollister of this city and G. W. Holister of Medford, Wis.


Oshkosh Daily Northwestern Monday, April 1,1907, p. 4.

WAS EARLY SETTLER
Mrs. Sarah M. Hollister, Who passed away Saturday, had lived in Oshkosh for sixty-one years. She came here in 1846 and was nearly eighty years of age--She was a woman of rare qualities of mind and heart--Funeral services are held this afternoon at Residence on High Street--Sketch of her life Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah M. Hollister, wife of the late Asa Hollister, were held this afternoon from her residence, 571 High street. This mornIng the remains were viewed by many friends and the members of the family, the body lying in state in the parlor of the home. Surrounding it were floral tributes testifying to the love and esteem in which Mrs. Holllster was held by those who knew her. As her demise occurred late Saturday afternoon and the funeral was Set for today, it was impossible to make any announcement of the services further than at the Easter service of the Algoma street Methodist Episcopal church Sunday. Nevertheless the house was filled at 2:30 o'clock, when the pastor of the church, Rev. Matthew J. Trenery, opened the service. He gave a scriptural reading, and spoke briefly from a text which Mrs. Hollister herself had selected, "For we know that if our earthly house of this tabernacle were dissolved, we have a building of God, his house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens."

CHOSE FUNERAL HYMNS.
Three hymns, also the choice of the deceased, not long before the end came, were sung by the church "quartet, composed of Mrs. H. N. Hart, Mrs. F.H. Fuller, O. H. Crawford and J.B. Carpenter. They sang "The Sweet Bye and Bye," "The Home of the Soul," and lastly,"Abide With Me." Internment of the remains occurred at the Riverside cemetery, in the lot where Asa Hollister is buried. Ther pallbearers were five grandsons and one grand-son-in-law; Ray A., Carl W., S. Rex, Leigh W. Hollister and William C. Houck, all of Oshkosh, and Myron Hollister of Florence. During the afternoon the office of Hollister, Amos & Co. was closed on account of the funeral.

WAS OLDEST RESIDENT.
In the death of Mrs. Hollister as announced in the Saturday issue of The Northwestern, Oshkosh has lost one of its earliest pioneers. With the exception of the Wright family, Mrs.Hollister had probably come here earier than any other resident, having arrived in Oshkosh in the spring of 1846, and living here continuously for a period of sixty-one years. Her death was the result of a decline which started in the winter of 1905-6, when she was bitten on a finger by a pet parrot. The Injury caused an attack of blood poisoning, and the shock revealed the first indication of heart trouble Mrs. Hollister ever showed in her long life. Early last summer she suffered the first of several paralytic strokes, complicated with heart trouble, from which she rallied each time. She was out of the house the last time at Christmas. Since then she had been confined to her bed most of the time.

END COMES CALMLY.
Last Wednesday night another stroke caused paralysis of the left aide, and through Thursday and Friday she lingered on the verge of death. At about ten o'clock Friday evening she became unconscious, and remained so untill the end came without a struggle at three o'clock Saturday afternoon. Mrs, Hollister had never used a glass to read by, and although nearly eighty years of age she had insisted on attending to her own housework until the last few months. She was a woman of marked self control, and it is said of her by one of the family that no never knew her to be out of temper.

MARRIES AT FIFTEEN.
Mrs. Hollister's maiden name was Sarah M. Toombs and she was born in England, probably at Birmingham, August 21, 1827, being therefore more than seventy-nine years old at the time of her death. She was one of five children born to Thomas and Anne Toombs. The family came to this country in 1830 and settled in Oneida county, N. Y., where the father became naturalized as a citizen of the United States in 1835. Then they removed to Burlington, Wis. on November 20. 1842, when she was but fifteen years of age, Sarah was married to Asa A. Hollister, a contractor and logger of Burlington. Her husband came to Oshkosh in the summer of 1843 and preempted a piece of land on the site of the old fair grounds on Jackson street. He then retured to Burlington, where the first son of the couple, W. W. Hollister, was born. Their second son, Seymour W. was born in August, 1845.

CAME HERE IN 1846.
In the following summer they came to Oshkosh and settled on Mr. Hollister's preemption, which he farmed for a short time. Later he conducted the Winnebago hotel, the second tavern in Oshkosh, which stood on the site of O. McCorison's store on Main street. He was in that business only a year or two, and then took his wife and children to the site now occupied by the old home on High street. This was at a time when the way to "town" led through a lane to Algoma street. The bank of the river then was only a few feet from the present house. Mr. Hollister became a partner with L. P. Sheldon in a sawmill. Soon afterward he withdrew from the partnership, however, and resumed logging operations. He was associated for a time with his brothers, Martin and Joseph. In the winter of 1865-66 he formed a partnership with his sons in lumbering, and in 1874 retired from active business, he died June 11, 1890, while in Shawano on a visit.

THE FAMILY.
There were four sons and one daughter born to the couple, Seymour W., P. Wright, Guy W., William W. and Anna Evalyn. W. W. died ten years ago, and the daughter died in infancy. Of the survivers, Col. S. W. Holllster is proprietor of Hollister, Amos & Co. of this city; P. W. is associated with the same firm; and G. W. is in business at Medford. Eleven grandchildren survive Mrs. Hollister. These are R. A. Hollister, Mrs. W. C. Bouck, C. W. S. Rex and Edith Loomis, sons and daughters of Colonel Hollister; Leigh W. son of P. W. Hollister; Myron W. son of Florence, Mrs. William H. Howell and Mrs. Oliver Mason of Tuscon, Ariz., son and daughters respectively of the late W. W. Hollister; and Evelyn H., daughter G.W. Hollister. Another son of Mr. and Mrs. Wright Hollister, Harry, died five years ago. In addition to these there are three great-grandchildren, Seymour W., son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Hollister of this city; and Catherine and Ethel, daughters of Myron Hollister of Florence.

SON ATTENDS
G. W. Hollister arrived here from Medford in time to attend the funeral. Mrs. Seymour Hollister was also here, called from the bedside of her father, Charles Loomis of Burlington, who is ill with an attack of heart trouble similar to that which attacked Mrs. Sarah Holllster. She will return to Burlington this evenlng. he deceased was a charter member of the Algoma Street M.E. church, being one of its supporters in its chapel days. For mony years she had been a stewardess in the church, and had always been a member of the Foreign Missionary society.


Biography from the website of the Oshkosh Public Museum

Sarah M. Toombs was born circa 1827 at England. Her family settled in Racine County, Wisconsin. Sarah M. Toombs was married there on Nov. 20, 1842 to Asa Hollister. They came to Oshkosh, Winnebago County in May 1846, where Asa was engaged in the lumber business. They were listed in the 1860 federal census as residing in the fifth ward of the city of Oshkosh. They had a family of five children: William W.; Seymour W.; Philip W., resided at Oshkosh; Guy W., resided at Medford, Wisconsin; and Anna Hollister. Sarah died in Oshkosh on Mar. 30, 1907.

 


HOLLISTER, SEYMOUR


Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, Saturday, Feb. 19, 1916, p. 2.

WORTH FELT BY ALL OSHKOSH MEN PROMINENT IN CIVIC AFFAIRS EXPRESS DEEP SORROW AT COLONEL HOLLISTER'S DEATH

He Was Regarded in ALL Quarters as a Citizens of Unusual Public Spirit and Always Active for Good of Community.
His Friends Speak in Praise of His Splendid Qualities of Mind and Heart.

Profound and sincere grief was evident about the city today because of the death early this morning of Col S. W. Hollister. one of the foremost and beloved citizens of Oshkosh. Kindliness was the keynote of most of the expressions heard among friends and business associates of the esteemed lumberman and manufacturer and his public spirit and democratic feeling were the subjects of unstinted praise. Following are a few of the many expressions of sorrow heard about town during the day:

Mayor John Mulva - "Mr. Hollister certainly was one of the foremost citizens of Oshkosh. I know that there is deep regret throughout the city at the loss of a man so truly honorable and having the best interests and general welfare of his home city so constantly at heart. We are all deeply grieved at losing him. You are at liberty to add anything you wish about his worth and popularity for he was truly one of the best of men."
E. R. Smith - "The Elks- lodge has lost through the death of Colonel Hollister one er its strongest members who was a power for good in the order. When are things were to be attempted he was willing to do not only his share, but more. While he did not hold office, did not seek office and would not accept office, he was always called upon in council whenever any matter of moment was under consideration and his advice, willingly given, was always found to be based upon business judgment and common sense and worthy of acceptance."
James H. Davidson - "The death of Mr. Hollister is a very great loss to the community. He was an exceptionally valuable man for Oshkosh always, generous always willing to aid in any movement for the upbuilding of the city, and esteemed and loved by every one who knew him. He was an extremely lovable character and a dear friend."
Moses Hooper - "It strikes me harder than would the death of any other man in Oshkosh outside my immediate family."
John C Thompson - "I should say the city will miss Colonel Hollister more than almost anyone else I can think of. He always had the best interests of Oshkosh at heart."
Louts Schribe - "Mr. Hollister's death is a great loss to the whole community. His sterling integrity, his generosity and his willingness to give his time for others had endeared him to all. We who have been closely associated with him in business will miss his wise counsel and advice."
Circuit Judge George W. Burnell - "Colonel Hollister was a very public spirited man and his death is a great loss to the city. He will he sadly missed by his business associates and personal friends, of whom he had a great many. I sincerely regret his death and sympathize with the surviving members of his family in the loss they have sustained."
Court Judge Fred Reglinger - "I considered Colonel Hollister a very useful and practical citizen. His death is a distinct loss to the city as well as to his relatives and a large circle of warm personal friends"


Biography from the website of the Oshkosh Public Museum

Seymour W. Hollister was born in 1845 at Burlington, Racine County, Wisconsin. He was a son of Asa A. and Sarah M. (Toombs) Hollister. Asa was born on Oct. 10, 1817 at Wayne County, New York. At age thirteen he removed with his parents to Chautauqua County, New York and they remained there until 1833. They then removed to Adrian, Michigan and stayed at that place for seven years. In 1840 the family removed to Racine County, Wisconsin. Asa was married there on Nov. 20, 1842 to Sarah M. Toombs. She was born circa 1827 at England. They came to Oshkosh, Winnebago County in May 1846, where Asa was engaged in the lumber business. They were listed in the 1860 federal census as residing in the fifth ward of the city of Oshkosh. They had a family of five children: William W.; Seymour W.; Philip W., resided at Oshkosh; Guy W., resided at Medford, Wisconsin; and Anna Hollister. Asa died at Shawano, Shawano County on June 11, 1890. He was returned to Oshkosh for burial in Riverside Cemetery. Sarah died in Oshkosh on Mar. 30, 1907. Seymour resided at Oshkosh and enlisted there on Aug. 12, 1864. He was assigned to Company B, 3rd (reorganized) Regimant, Wis. Cav. on Feb. 1, 1865. He was mustered out on June 19, 1865. After the war, Seymour resided at Deerfield, Chickasaw County, Iowa. On Sept. 15, 1876 he was attacked and robbed. His house and contents were burned. He also resided for a time at Chicago, Illinois. He was listed in the 1885 census (21st Regt., N.Y. Vol. Inf.) at P.O. Oshkosh. He was listed in 1888 as a member of GAR Post #10 at Oshkosh. In a biography of his father from 1889, Seymour was then in Canada and engaged in the lumber business. The lumber mill with which he was connected was located at Garden River, Ontario, Canada. He was listed in the 1890 federal census as residing in the city of Oshkosh. Earl, son of Seymour, died of diphtheria at Oshkosh in Dec. 1892 at age 5 years and 7 months. Seymour was listed in the 1895 and 1905 Wisconsin State census at P.O. Oshkosh. He was married in 1868 at Kewaunee, Kewaunee County to Katherine G. Smith. She was born on May 11, 1846. She came to this country when 7 years old. They had a family of five children. Katherine died at their home on Algoma Street in Oshkosh on Nov. 19, 1896. She was survived by Seymour and four children: Asa Raymond Hollister; Winifred S. Hollister, age 17 years, later married William C. Bouck; Carl W. Hollister, age 13 years; and S. Rex Hollister, age 12 years. Katherine was buried in Oshkosh at Riverside Cemetery. Seymour was then married to Lottie Irene Loomis on Nov. 24, 1897 at Burlington, Racine County. She was born at Burlington on Nov. 11, 1866 and was a daughter of Charles W. and Hannah (Brittain) Loomis. Lottie had removed to Oshkosh in 1889. Seymour and Lottie had one daughter, Edith Loomis Hollister. Hannah Loomis, mother of Lottie, died in Oshkosh on July 21, 1926. Seymour was listed in 1905 as president of Oshkosh Trunk Co. and residing at 922 Algoma Street in Oshkosh. Carl and Rex Hollister were then residing with him. Sarah, mother of Seymour, was also listed in that year as residing at 571 High Street in Oshkosh. Seymour died at Oshkosh on Feb. 19, 1916 and Lottie died there on Aug. 20, 1935. She was survived by her daughter Edith, two step-sons, Carl W. and R.A. Hollister, and three grandchildren.

 

History of northern Wisconsin: containing an account of its settlement, growth, development, Western Historical Co., Chicago, 1881 p. 1149.

Biography: Winnebago County, Wisconsin: Seymour W. Hollister

S.W. Hollister, lumberman, established in 1846, employs one hundred men in logging season, and gets out from eight to twelve million feet logs during the season. Mr. Hollister was born in Racine Co., Wis., Aug. 17, 1845. His parents moved to Oshkosh, Wis., in 1845. His father built the second hotel erected in city of Oshkosh, called the Winnebago Hotel. At a suitable age, Mr. S.W. Hollister attended the city schools and began business for himself; at twenty years of age, first connected himself with the lumber business, and since followed the same. He was married in Kewaunee Co., Wis., Nov. 7, 1868, to Miss Katie G. Smith; she was born in Germany. They have two children- Asa R. and Sarah W.

 


HOLLISTER, WILLIAM WALLACE


Green Bay Gazette, May 26, 1896.

DEATH OF W.W. HOLLISTER.
Spinal Trouble Causes His Demise After a Long Illness.

William W. Hollister died at his residence, 718 Mason Street, at 6:15 this morning, of spinal trouble at the age of 52 years. Mr. Hollister had been ailing for the past year and had been quite sick for several months. Besides his wife, three children, two daughters Annie and Ethel, and one son, Myron, survive him.

Mr. Hollister was a member of the G.A.R. and lived in the city for the past four years. The body will be taken to Oshkosh over the Northwestern Road Thursday morning for interment. Previous to remains to the depot short services in which the Waverly quartette will sing appropriate hymns, will be held at the residence.


Oshkosh Daily Northwestern, April 1, 1936, p 4.

[FREDERICKA HOLLISTER] FORMER RESIDENT OF WINNEBAGO COUNTY IS BURIED AT GREEN BAY

Funeral services for Mrs. William W. Hollister [Fredericka Schooley], a former resident of Winnebago county, who died Friday at the Wisconsin Veterans Home, were held Monday at Green Bay with burial at the Fort Howard cemetery there. Those attending the services from Oshkosh were Miss Edith Hollister, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pommarane, and Mrs. Ora Lewis. Mrs. Hollister's death followed a brief illness. Before here marriage to the late William W. Hollister on Nov. 26, 1868, she was Miss Frederica Schooley, eldest child of Joseph and Sarah Brooks Schooley, pioneer residents of Winnebago county. She was born Oct. 28, 1849, in the town of Oshkosh, later moving to Neenah. Mrs. Hollister is survived by. two children, Mrs. O. A. Mason, of Ogden, Utah; and Myron Hollister, Green Bay. Also surviving are seven grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren; and a sister, Mrs. Louise Nicholson, of Inglewood, Calif.


Soldiers' and Citizens' Album of Biographical Record containing personal sketches of Army Men and Citizens Prominent in loyalty to the Union, 1888, p. 559-560.

William W. Hollister, a citizen of Shawano, Wis., and a member of G. A. R. Post No. 81, was born November 26, 1844, in Racine County, Wis. He is the son of Asa and Sarah Ann (Toombs) Hollister, both of whom are living at Oshkosh. He paternal grandfather was a soldier in the Mexican war and was a descendant of Major Hollister who was in the British service during the Revolution. Mr. Hollister has three brothers; Phillip W., and Guy reside at Marinette, Wis., and are engaged in the lumber business and in the manufacture of sash, doors and blinds. G. W. Hollister is engaged in lumbering and milling in Canada and was a soldier in the 3rd Wisconsin Cavalry. Mr. Hollister of this sketch grew to manhood in Wisconsin and he enlisted August 30, 1864, in Company E, 2nd Wisconsin Cavalry for one year or during the war, and made connection with the command at Memphis, Tenn., where he was engaged in scouting duty and in all other relations pertaining to cavalry service, in which he was engaged until the regiment was disbanded. In the spring of 1865 he was engaged in protecting Union citizens from rebels and bushwackers and in June of that year was discharged as stated. Among the expeditions in which he took part was the second raid under Grierson in Mississippi. He escaped without serious injury or illness and he acted in the capacity of Orderly Sergeant in which he was engaged in the parole and exchange of rebel soldiers. On his return from the army he came to Oshkosh and engaged in lumbering, which has since formed his business connection and where he has also operated as a contractor. In 1882 he removed to Shawano where he has since been similarly engaged. He has held the office of Town Clerk, as a stanch Republican and is proud to belong to a political organization of such noble record. In youth he received a limited education and belongs to the best class of self-made men and his business has become large and prosperous through his own efforts.

He was married to Frederica B. Schooley of Neenah and their three children, Anna E., Ethel and Myron W., have been carefully reared and educated and the elder daughter is a student at Ripon College.

 


LOOMIS, CHARLES


Burlington Standard Democrat Friday, Feb 28, 1913, p. 1.

CHAS. LOOMIS DEAD--BORN HERE 75 YEARS AGO

Passed Away at Edward Street Home Monday Morning Charles W. Loomis The oldest living resident of Bur- lington passed away Monday morning in the person of Charles W. Loomis. History tells us that Mr. Loomis was the first white Male child born in the the town of Burlington, this important event taking place on May 1, 1838, nearly 75 years ago. Charles W. Loomis was the oldest son of Herman and Elizabeth (Toombs) Lewis, the senior Loomis being one of Burlington's earliest pioneers, He came here with his family from New York state in 1835 and took up government land in sections 3 and 4, town of Burlington, and proceeded make a home for the family. Four children were born to them, Charles, Catherine L, Charlotte and Mary. But death came to the parents in 1847. Mr. Loomis living only a month after the death of his wife in September. The four children were cared for by relatives. Charles going to Oneida, New York, to make his home with his uncle, A. Loomis. When a young man Charles Loomis returned to Burlington and again made his home on the farm which the father had bought,and here he resided sided. till he moved to the Edward street home about ten years ago. On December 27, 1865, Mr. Loomis was united united. in marriage with Miss Hannah Brittain at Honey Creek, who has been a faithful helpmeet for these many years. One daughter Mrs, Lottie Irene Hollister, wife of Col. S. W. Hollister, of Oshkosh, survives him, with the mother. Two sisters, Mrs. Wortman, of Spring Prairie, and Mrs. Earl of Oshkosh, also survive him. Mr. Loomis had been in feeble health for several years, and for the past year had suffered greatly from the dropsical and other troubles. His funeral took place Wednesday afternoon with internment in the Burlington cemetery. Rev. G. H. Marsh, of Rockford, conducted the services. Mr. Loomis was a man universally esteemed. A lifetime spent on the home farm made him friends of his neighbors and all who learned to know him.In the home he was an ideal husband and father. As a citizen he was above reproach. He lived more than the allotted three score of years and ten and his exemplary life is a lesson that will redound to the credit of the follower.


Burlington Standard Press, Friday, February 28, 1913.

BORN HERE 75 YEARS AGO. PASSED AWAY AT EDWARD STREET HOME MONDAY MORNING.

The oldest living resident of Burlington passed away Monday morning in the person of Charles W. Loomis. History tells us that Mr. Loomis was the first white male child born in the Town of Burlington, that important event taking place on May 1, 1838, nearly 75 years ago. Charles W. Loomis was the oldest son of Herman and Elizabeth (Toombs) Loomis, the senior Loomis being one of Burlington's earliest pioneers. He came here with his family from New York state in 1835 and took up government land in section 3 and 4, Town of Burlington, and proceeded to make a home for the family. Four children were born to them, Charles, Catherine L., Charlotte and Mary. But death came to the parents in 1847. Mr. Loomis living only a month after the death of his wife in September. The four children were cared for by relatives. Charles going to Oneida, New York, to make his home with his uncle, A. Loomis. When the young man Charles Loomis returned to Burlington and again made his home on the farm which the father had bought, and here he resided till he moved to the Edward St. home about ten years ago. On Dec. 27, 1865, Mr. Loomis was united in marriage with Miss. Hannah Brittain at Honey Creek, who has been a faithful helpmeet for these many years. One daughter, Miss Lottie Irene Hollister, wife of Col. S.W. Hollister, of Oshkosh, survives him with the mother. Two sisters, Mrs. Wortman of Spring Prairie and Mrs. Earl of Oshkosh also survive him. Mr. Loomis had been in feeble health for several years, and for the past year had suffered greatly from a dropsical and other trouble. His funeral took place Wednesday afternoon, with internment in Burlington cemetery. Rev. G.H. Marsh, of Rockford, conducting the services. Mr. Loomis was a man unusually esteemed. A lifetime spent on the home farm made him friends of his neighbors and all who learned to know him. In the home he was an ideal husband and father. As a citizen he was above reproach. He lived more than the allotted three score of years and ten and his exemplary is a lesson that will rebound to the credit of the follower.


Biography from the website of the Oshkosh Public Museum

Charles William Loomis was born May 1, 1838 in Burlington, WI. He was the son of Heman Loomis and Elizabeth Toombs Loomis. He married Hannah Brittain on December 27, 1865 in Honey Creek, WI near where he farmed. The couple had one daughter, Lottie Irene Loomis Hollister born in 1866. He was still living in 1909 when the Loomis Family History was published.

 


LOOMIS, HANNAH (neé Brittain)


Burlington Standard Democrat Friday, July 23, 1926, p. 1.

Mrs. Chas. Loomis Dead

Mrs. Charles Loomis, a former resident of Burlington, passed away Wednesday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. W. Hollister, in Oahkosh. Funeral services will be held this afternoon (Friday) at 2 o'clock at the home of her sister, Mrs. Otis Vaughn, on Lewis Street. Rev. F. A. Stever will officiate and interment will be in the Burlington cemtery. The body arrived in Burlington Thuraday evening on a Soo line train. A complete obituary will be printed next week.


Burlington Free Press, Burlington, Wis., Thursday, July 22, 1926, p. 1.

Death of Mrs. Chas. Loomis

Mrs. Charles Loomis, a pioneer rersident who had made her home in this city and vicinity for the past seventy years, passed away on Wednesday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. W. Hollister, at Oshkosh. Death was due to a complication of troubles. Hannah Brittain, daughter of Wlliam and Elizabeth Brittain, was born in Lincolnshire, England, July 16, 1843. She came to America with her parents in 1855 and they settled at Honey Creek. Deceased was married to Charles Loomis in December, 1865, and they went to housekeeping on the farm two miles southeast of this city, where they made their home until their removal to this city nearly a quarter of a century ago. Mr. Loomis died in 1918 and Mrs. Loomis has made this city her home since then. She has been spending the winters of late at the home of her daughter in Oshkosh. A daughter, Mrs. S. W. Hollister of Oshkosh; one sister, Mrs, Otis Vaughn of this city and a brother, John Brittain of Wasco, Calif., are living. The funeral will take place on Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Vaughn home at 602 Lewis street. Rev. F. A. Stever officiating, with interment in the Burlington cemetery.


Burlington Standard Press, Friday, July 30, 1926, p. 6.

Mrs. Charles Loomis

Funeral services were held at the home of Mrs. Otis Vaughn on Lewis street last Friday afternoon for Mrs. Charles Loomis, one of the well known matrons of this vicinity, who died the previous Wednesday, July 21, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. W. Hollister, at Oshkosh. Hannah Brittain was born in Lincolnshire, England, July 16, 1843. When a girl she came to America with her parents who settled near Honey Creek. In 1866 she was united in marriage with Mr. Loomis and they settled on a farm south of the city where they lived until twentyfive years ago when they moved to Burlington. Mr. Loomis died in 1913 and for the past few years Mrs. Loomis has spent the winters with her daughter, Mrs. S. W. Hollister, at Oshkosh. One sister, Mrs. Otis Vaughn, and one brother, John Brittain, of Wasco, Calif., besides the daughter survive. Also one grandchild, Miss Edith Hollister Those from away who attended the funeral are: Mr. and Mrs. Ray Hollister, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hollister, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Bonck, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Morris, Miss Ruth Morris, Mrs. Wright Hollister, Mrs. James Edwards, Miss Edith Hollister, Miss Loraine Cheeseman, Oshkosh; Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Clark, Manitowoc; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Potter, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Potter and family, Elkhorn; Chas. Loomis, Orlo Loomis, Miss Kittie Loomis, Miss Minnie Loomis, Miss Esther Loomis, Elgin; Mr. and Mrs. Hubbard C. Atkins, Mrs. Frederick Allen, Miss Ina Darbellay, Milwaukee; Mrs. A. Wortman, Mrs. Chas. Valley and family, Delavan.


Racine Journal News, Friday Afternoon, July 23, 1926, p. 2.

MRS. HANNAH LOOMIS DIES AT OSHKOSH

Mrs. Hannah Loomis, one of the older residents of this (BURLINGTON) city, passed away on Wednesday (21st) at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S.W. Hollister at Oshkosh, according to word received her. Death came suddenly, and is a great shock to Mrs. Loomis' many friends in this city and the surrounding community. Miss Hannah Brittain was born July 16, 1843, in the county of Lincolnshire, Eng. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Brittian. At the age of 12 years she came with her parents to America. Mr. and Mrs. Brittain settled near Honey Creek, and it was here that Mrs. Loomis's girlhood was spent. In December, 1865, the deceased was united in marriage to Charles Loomis and the young couple took up their residence on a farm southeast of this city, which remained their home until about 25 years ago when they removed to Burlington. This city remained their home until Mr. Loomis' death in 1913. Mrs. Loomis continued to live here following the death of her husband but of late years has been spending the winters at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Hollister, in Oshkosh. She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Otis Vaughn of this city, a brother, John Brittain, of Wasco, Calif, and one daughter, Mrs. S.W. Hollister, Oshkosh. Funeral services will be held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn, 602 Lewis Street. The Rev. F.A. Stever, pastor of the Plymouth Congregational church, will officiate. Burial will be at the Burlington cemetery at Brown's lake.

 


TOOMBS, ARTEMESIA (neé Rose)


Burlington Free Press, Thursday, February 27,1919, p. 1.

Mrs. Samuel Toombs (nee Artemesia Rose) died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Wm. K. Bushnell, near this city, on Monday morning, February 24, aged nearly 89 years. The deceased was born at Fort Montgomery-on-the-Hudson, New York, May 6, 1830. She was married April 18, 1850, at Yorkville, Wis., to Samuel Toombs, where she was making her home with her brother, Vincent Rose. Mr. Toombs died Nov. 4, 1902. She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. W.K. Bushnell of Burlington; and two sons, Albert Toombs, Pompey's Pillar, Mont., and Jerome Toombs, Orson, Iowa. Also a sister, Mrs. Susan Weyant of Cornwall, New York. The funeral was held from the Bushnell residence on Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. E. L. Benson officiating and internment was had in the town cemetery.


Burlington Standard Democrat Friday, Feb., 28, 1919, p. 1.

MRS. SAMUEL TOOMBS DIED MONDAY

Resided in Burlington Since. 1850—Three Children Survive In the death of Mrs. Samuel Toombs at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. K. Bushnell Monday morning another of the pioneers of Racine county has passed to the great beyond. Coming to the town of Burlington as a bride in 1850, she has resided here since then. Fulfilling the duties of wife, mother and neighbor in a quiet und unostentacious manner, she was honored and respected by all who knew her. Her funeral took place from the Bushnell home at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. E. L. Benson, of Plymouth Congregational church, conducting the services, with interment in the Burlington cemetery.

Mrs. Toombs, whose maiden name was Artemesia Rose, was born at Fort Montgomery on the Hudson, N. Y., May 6, 1830. As a girl she came to the town of Yorkville to make her home with her brother, Vincent Rose. Here she was married to Samuel Toombs on April 10, 1850, and they came to the town of Burlington to make their home. Mr. Toombs died November 4, 1902, and since that time she has made her home with her daughter, Mrs. Wm. K. Bushnell. Besides the daughter she is survived by two sons, Albert H. Toombs, of Pompeys Pillar, Mont, and Jerome Toombs, of Orson, Iowa, and one sister, Mrs. Susan Weyant, of Cornwall, N. Y.


Racine Times Call, Wednesday, February 26, 1919, p. 2.

Mrs. Samuel Toombs died yesterday morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. William K. Bushnell south of this city after being confined to her bed for more than a year. Mrs. Toombs was one of Burlington's oldest and most respected citizens and had reached the age of 86 years. She is survived by one daughter, Mrs. W. K. Bushnell, of Burlington, and two sons, Jerome Toombs of Iowa, and Albert Toombs of Pompeys Pillar, Montana. The funeral will be held from the Bushnell home Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. Benson will officiate. Interment will be the Burlington cemetery.

 


TOOMBS, JEROME


1915 Harrison County Iowa History, p. 695 & 696.

Since 1878 Jerome TOOMBS has been a resident of Harrison county, Iowa, and for the past twenty years he has been engaged in the buying, feeding and selling of hogs and cattle, and has made a pronounced success of this line of activity. He is a man of excellent business ability and is now one of the largest stock shippers in the county.

Jerome TOOMBS, the son of Samuel and Artemisia (ROSE) TOOMBS, was born March 6, 1852, in Racine county, Wisconsin. His parents were natives of England and New York, respectively. Samuel TOOMBS came to the United States with his parents when seven years of age, the family first locating in New York, later, in 1839, moving to Wisconsin, being among the first settlers in that state. In 1852 Samuel TOOMBS went to California, leaving his family in Wisconsin. He was not successful in finding gold and returned to Wisconsin, where he spent the rest of his life.

Jerome TOOMBS received a limited education in Racine county, Wisconsin, and early in life began to work on the farm, spending as much time as he could in the school room during the winter seasons. When he was twenty-four years of age he started out working for himself in the pineries in the northern part of Wisconsin. He worked in the woods one winter and in 1878 came to Harrison county, Iowa, where he worked by the month for the first year or two. He then rented land for about five years, but in the meantime became interested in the buying and shipping of stock. In 1894 he began to buy stock which he would feed for the market and has followed this business ever since.

Mr. TOOMBS was married June 29, 1905, to Mrs. Mary (BURNS) EDMONDS, a daughter of Samuel BURNS, a pioneer settler of Harrison county, and the widow of Orson EDMONDS, for whom the town of Orson was named.

Mr. TOOMBS is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Little Sioux. He is a Democrat, but is not a partisan in any sense of the word. He always votes for the best men regardless of their politics. He has been trustee of Jackson township for one term and rendered his fellow citizens efficient service during his incumbency. Mrs. TOOMBS is a member of the Catholic church.


Obituary from an unknown Iowa newspaper

Jerome Toombs was born March 6, 1852 at Racine, Wisconsim. The following summer his father left for the gold fields of California. [His mother] took him and his year old sister back to [New] York state to her fathers farm which is now West Point Academy, he having sold it to the government. Jerome lived the first seven years of his life there. the father returned and they settled in Burlington, Wisconsin where he lived until 1878 when he came out to what is now Orson, Iowa. He spent all but one year of his remaining life there, going out to Colorado for that period.

He married Mary, the widow of Orson Edmonds in 1905, and she passed on in 1915. He was married to Mollie Stockwell Jones on February 1, 1917.

For years he was the market for grain and livestock for the Orson territory until his aging years cased him to give up the business.

On the 10th day of September, 1943 he and his wife moved to Missouri Valley to live with his step daughter Mrs. L.E. Mead, that he might have better care.

He met his death by falling and fracturing his skull on the evening of October 25, 1943, living only an hour and a half after the accident. He was rushed to the Mercy Hospital in Council Bluffs, but his age, 91 years, 7 months and 19 days and his frail body could not stand the shock.

He leaves to mourn his passing his wife Mollie Toombs, four step children, George Edmonds of Orson, Lum Edmonds of Little Sioux, Mrs. L.E. Mead in whose home he was living and Fields Jones of Independance, Missouri. Also one niece, Ida Bushnell of Burlington, Wisconsin.

Elder George Maggers, assisted by Elder Frank Hough conducted the services at Missouri Valley, Wednesday afternoon, October 27th and the remains were shipped to his old home in Wisconsin where he was laid to rest by the side of his mother and father, as was his wish and desire.

 


TOOMBS, SAMUEL


Burlington Free Press, Wednesday, November 12, 1902, p. 2.

Samuel Toombs, an old and well known resident of this vicinity, died last week Tuesday at his home several miles southeast of this city. He had been in poor health for several years past and a short time before his death had the misfortune to break an arm, which added to his general ill- health, no doubt hastened his death. Mr. Toombs was born in Buckinghamsire, England, February 21, 1820, and came to New York when he was seven years old. In 1839 he came to Burlington with his parents, who located on the farm where the subject of this sketch was living at the time of his death. In 1852 Mr. Toombs went to California via the Isthmus of Panama route and remained there seven years. Returning to Wisconsin he spent the balance of his life in this vicinity. In 1851 he was married in Yorkville, this county, to Miss Artemesa Rose, who survives him, together with three children as follows: Mrs Wm K Bushnell and Albert Toombs of the town of Burlington and Jerome Toombs of Orson, Iowa.

Mr. Toombs was the second oldest of three sisters and one brother, who have all passed away before him but one, Mrs. Asa Hollister, of Oshkosh, aged 75 years, who was here at the time of his death. Mr. Toombs was well known in this vicinity where he had resided nearly sixty years and was esteemed as an upright and worthy citizen. The funeral of Mr. Toombs was held from his late home on Thursday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. Wm. Killburne conducting the services, and internment was had in the town cemetery.


Burligton Standard Democrat, Saturday, Nov 8, 1902, German Edition.

On Tuesday another of the pioneer settlers of Burlington passed from the earth. Samuel Toombs died on the old homestead about two miles southeast of the city on that day. Mr. Toombs had been in poor health for some time. Recently he was unfortunate enough to break his arm, and his feebleness was unable to withstand the shock. He suffered greatly until death came to him as a gentle relief.

Mr. Toombs was born in Buckinghamshire, England, Feb. 13, 1813. He came to Wisconsin and located in Burlington in 1839 and has since resided here. In 1849 he was united in marriage with Miss Artemeisa Rose in Racine, who. with three children, Mrs. Wm. K. Bushnell and Albert Toombs of this town, and Jerome Toombs of Orson, Iowa, survive him. Mr. Toombs was a man prominent in public affairs of the community for many years. He was a staunch democrat and took an active part in politics in early days. He was well known all through this section and esteemed as a good, upright and honest citizen by all. The funeral of Mr. Toombs took place from his late home at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. Wm. Killburne conducting the services, and the remains were laid to rest in the town cemetery.


The History of Racine and Kenosha Counties, Wisconsin, Publ. 1879 by Western Historical Company, Chicago, p. 652.

Samuel Toombs, farmer, Sec. 19; P.O. Burlington; he was born in Buckinghamshire, England, Feb. 13, 1813; he came to Wisconsin in 1839, located in Burlington, and engaged in farming; by industry and strict economy, he has accumulated a handsome property. He married, in Racine, in April, 1849, Miss Artemisa ROSE; she was born in Orange Co., N.Y. They have three children living - Addie (married Wm. BUSHNELL), Jerome and Albert. Mr. TOOMBS owns 100 acres of fertile land, finely improved, good barns - a pleasant home.

 


INDEX to Toombs Family Obituaries and Biographies

 

 

 



Copyright © 1998-2015 - Bella Vista Ranch